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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Quality of medical care assessment using outcome measures found in the catalog.

Quality of medical care assessment using outcome measures

Quality of medical care assessment using outcome measures

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Published by Rand in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Medical care -- Evaluation

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesMedical care assessment using outcome measures
    Statementprepared for the National Center for Health Services Research [by] Robert H. Brook ... [et al.]
    SeriesRand report -- R-2021/1-2-HEW, R (Rand Corporation) -- R-2021/1-2-HEW
    ContributionsBrook, Robert H. 1943-, National Center for Health Services Research
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18106900M

    Patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) are a critical way to assess whether clinicians are improving the health of patients. Unlike process measures, which capture provider productivity and adherence to the standards of recommended care, or patient experience measures, which focus on aspects of care delivery such as communication, PROMs attempt to capture whether the services . To achieve the outcome of improving sleep quality or satisfaction, pre- and post-treatment assessment of sleep quality or satisfaction and providing an evidence-based treatment are recommended.

    5. Coordination of care actively linking the enrollee to providers, medical services, residential, social, behavioral, and other support services where needed; 6. Monitoring; 7. Continuity of care; and 8. Follow-up and documentation. Care management is driven by quality-based outcomes such as: improved/maintainedFile Size: KB. These performance measures (Measures) are not clinical guidelines, do not establish a standard of medical care, and have not been tested for all potential applicants. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), and its related organization, the Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI), shall not be responsible for any use of the Size: KB.

    Evaluating the Quality of Health Care 6. Process Measures. Process measures attempt to answer the question ”Did this patient receive the right care,” or “what percent of the time did patients of this type receive the right care?” Such measures are typically developed based on the known relationship between a process and outcomes. ACO quality measures not created by CMS carry the disclaimer that “These performance measures are not clinical guidelines and do not establish a standard of medical care, and have not been tested for all potential applications”. When sponsors attach such disclaimers to their metrics, it is appropriate to question their use in public Cited by:


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Quality of medical care assessment using outcome measures Download PDF EPUB FB2

Quality of Medical Care Assessment Using Outcome Measures Eight Disease-Specific Applications by Allyson Ross Davies, T. Lelah, Nancy E. Solomon, L. Jeff Harris, Robert H. Brook, Sheldon Greenfield, John E.

Ware, C. AveryCited by: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Quality of medical care assessment using outcome measures. Santa Monica, Calif.: Rand, (OCoLC) Brook, Robert H. and Allyson Ross Davies, Quality of Medical Care Assessment Using Outcome Measures: Executive Summary.

Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, Cited by: 3. Get this from a library. Quality of medical care assessment using outcome measures: executive summary. [Robert H Brook; Allyson Ross Davies; Rand. 18 Using Patient Reports of Outcomes to Assess Effectiveness of Medical Care Paul D. Cleary In this chapter, I provide a brief overview of some of our current and recent work on the development and evaluation of outcomes measures based on patient by: 3.

The outcome of medical care, in terms of recovery, restoration of function and of survival, has been frequently used as an indicator of the quality of medical care. Examples are studies of perinatal mortality, 6, 7 surgical fatality rates 8 and social restoration of patients discharged from Cited by: The outcome of medical care, in terms of recovery, restoration of function and of survival, has been frequently used as an indicator of the quality of medical care.

Examples are studies of perinatal mortality, 6, 7 surgical fatality rates 8 and social restoration of patients discharged from. However, a number of considerations limit the use of outcomes as measures of the quality of care.

The first of these is whether the outcome of care is, in fact, the relevant measure. This is because outcomes reflect both the power of medical science to achieve certain results under any. Background. In the interest of promoting high-quality, patient-centered care and accountability, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and Hospital Quality Alliance (HQA) began publicly reporting day mortality measures for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF) in June and for pneumonia (PN) in June 5.

Outcome Measures There is a long history of using outcomes to assess care quality. The use of outcome data to evaluate health care dates back more than years. In the s, a physician named Pierre-Charles-Alexandre Louis started a group in Paris that discussed the use of statistics to examine patterns of medical care and Size: 1MB.

What Types of Measures Can We Use. Categories of Measures. Quality measures can apply to various aspects of health care.

Although there is no standardized set of categories, the categories, structure, process, and outcomes developed by Avedis Donabedian, M.D., a pioneer in the science of measuring health care quality, are still widely used today.

We argue that outcomes assessment, or measuring directly the efficiency of a health care system (whether hospital, physician group, or larger network) is instead the ideal approach to solving these twin problems of lagging quality and cost growth.

We first contrast technology assessment and outcomes assessment, and then. outcomes assessment tools, as well as generic responses such as “outcome measures for swallowing.” In accordance with this broad definition, fewer than half of the SLPs in health care settings (%) reported use of outcome measures in their documentation.

Figure 1. Frequency of use of outcome measures by speech-language pathologists in File Size: KB. For many years, health care providers have worked to collect so-called patient-reported outcomes measures, or PROMs, which are measures of function and health status reported by patients.

Measures can also prevent the overuse, underuse, and misuse of health care services and can identify disparities in care delivery and outcomes. Measures are used for quality improvement. Outcome Measures There is a long history of using outcomes to assess care quality.

The use of outcome data to evaluate health care dates back more than years. In the s, a physician named Pierre-Charles-Alexandre Louis started a group in Paris that discussed the use of statistics to examine patterns of medical care and outcomes.

Process measures improve quality and cost by enabling organizations to reduce the amount of variation in care delivery. When you establish process metrics at potential points of variation in a care process, you can monitor and reduce inappropriate variation. A value stream map is a great tool to outline a care process and identify potential.

An outcome measure is a tool used to assess a patient’s current status. Outcome measures may provide a score, an interpretation of results and at times a risk categorization of the patient. Prior to providing any intervention, an outcome measure provides baseline data.

The initial results may help determine the course of treatment intervention. The Joint Commission standard CTS requires behavioral health organizations to assess outcomes for the individuals they serve through the use of a standardized tool or instrument.

Learn more about complying with that standard here. Measurement-based care has become a high-profile issue in the behavioral health care field, and The Joint.

Description of Measure: The SF is a item scale constructed to survey health status and quality of life (Ware & Sherbourne, ). The SF assesses eight health concepts: limitations in physical activities because of health problems; limitations in social activities because of physical or emotional problems; limitations in usual role activities because of physical health problems.

Measures used to assess and compare the quality of health care organizations are classified as either a structure, process, or outcome measure. Known as the Donabedian model, this classification system was named after the physician and researcher who formulated it.The development of standardized functional assessment measures across post-acute care settings has been ongoing since ; however, efforts to develop uniform, standardized functional assessment measures has been an ongoing effort.

A functional measures progress timeline can be accessed in the 'Downloads' section below.1. Overview and Description. An Outcome Measure is a qualitative or quantitative measurement of outcome, 1 generally in response to a rehabilitation intervention in the context of physiatry, 2 and will be referred to as Rehabilitation Measure of Outcome (RMO) in this article.

RMOs are vital to the practice of evidence-based medicine, and can be understood in the context of the World Health.